Maureen Fraîche

Mixing Business and Pleasure in the Kitchen

Deep Dish Cinnamon Buns with Grandma Hazel’s Creamy Glaze

Deep Dish Cinnamon Buns

Well now!  It has been several weeks since my last post and for that, I am sorry.  The holidays have a way of making the time fly, what with all the merry making.  I do hope you had a lovely Christmas and the new year is just around the corner!  If you happen to be one of the many who plan to shed pounds in 2013, stay tuned for future posts to help you with your goals.  In addition to waistline-friendly recipes, I’ll be sure to post tips, tricks, and commonsense recommendations for your nutrition and fitness resolutions.

In the meantime, however, let there be Deep Dish Cinnamon Buns!  Let me be clear, I have not tweaked or modified these to be a ‘health food.’  No, these are an indulgence, pure and simple: a potato-enriched yeast dough is shaped, dunked in butter and then rolled in a brown sugar-cinnamon coating, baked until glorious and finally drizzled with Grandma Hazel’s Creamy Glaze.  These are absolutely worth the effort and your family is sure to rise up and call you blessed.

This recipe is yet another adaptation from one of my favorite cook books, Pure Flavor.  If you do not own it, follow the link and buy yourself a belated Christmas present.

A few thoughts as you get started.  You’ll be using some of the potato cooking liquid to proof your yeast.  Before adding the yeast, be sure the liquid is not too hot.  It should be lukewarm, no hotter than 110 degrees.  No thermometer handy?  If the liquid is uncomfortably hot to your finger, it will likely kill your yeast.  I know this because I got all hasty, added my yeast too soon and killed it.  Hear ye, patience is a virtue: wait until the liquid is lukewarm and be sure you see the yeast get nice and foamy before proceeding.

Also, this is a soft dough and as such, you may be tempted to add more flour than is necessary.  Don’t.  If handling the dough leaves you with sticky hands, give them a good dusting of flour or anoint your mitts with a few drops of cooking oil beforehand.

Deep Dish Cinnamon Buns with Grandma Hazel’s Creamy Glaze
Serves 12 or 15

For the cinnamon buns:

Ingredients

1 medium russet potato, peeled and diced
1 packet active dry yeast (about 2 ¼  teaspoons)
½ cup granulated sugar
1 ¾  teaspoons salt
12 tablespoons (1 ½ sticks) butter, melted (divided)
1 large egg
4 ½ to 5 cups all-purpose flour
2 cups unpacked light brown sugar
4 teaspoons cinnamon
Crisco or cooking spray for greasing a 9×13 baking dish

Begin by boiling your diced potato until tender, about 15 minutes.  Drain the potatoes, reserving 1 ¼ cups of the cooking liquid.  Mash the potatoes until smooth and measure out ½ cup.  Set both the mashed potatoes and liquid aside to cool.

Once the liquid is lukewarm (about 110 degrees), sprinkle in your yeast and allow to proof for about 10 minutes, or until nice and foamy.

Using the paddle attachment on your electric mixer, mix together the 1/2 cup mashed potatoes, yeast mixture, granulated sugar, 1 ½ teaspoons salt, 6 tablespoons of the melted butter, and the egg.  Once combined, switch to the dough hook attachment and add 2 ½ cups of the flour.  Knead on medium speed and continue to add flour until you have a soft and elastic dough, about 8-10 minutes.  As this is a soft dough, resist the temptation to keep adding flour–4 ½ to 5 cups should truly be sufficient.  Scrape your dough into a large zip-lock sack spritzed with cooking spray and seal or, alternatively, into a large bowl that has been lightly oiled, turn the dough to coat, and cover with plastic wrap.  Refrigerate overnight.

In the morning, begin by lightly greasing a 9 x 13 baking dish.  Next you’ll want to melt your remaining butter in a small bowl.  In a shallow dish, mix together the brown sugar, cinnamon, and ¼ teaspoon salt.  Now you’re ready to make those buns!  Pull out your dough, turn it out on a lightly floured surface (or Silpat) and knead a few times to soften it up.  Divide the dough into two balls and then each ball into 6 portions for a total of 12 portions.  (For a more modest bun, divide into 15 portions.) One by one, dunk each ball in the melted butter and then roll in the brown sugar mixture.  Make sure each bun has a good coating and then arrange in your 9 x 13.  Cover with plastic wrap and allow to rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 45 minutes.

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.  Once the buns have doubled in size, pop them in the oven and bake for 25 minutes, or until cooked through and golden brown in places.  (If you’re not sure whether they’re done, you can slide a sharp knife into the center of one of the buns and take a peek.  It should look cooked, not doughy.)  While letting these amazing buns cool for a few minutes, you can get on with making the glaze.

Grandma Hazel’s Creamy Glaze

1 ½ cups powdered sugar
2 tablespoons butter, melted
1 ½ teaspoons vanilla
4 to 6 teaspoons hot water

Whisk together all ingredients and drizzle to your heart’s content!

Nutrition information per serving (1 bun (1/12 of recipe) with glaze): 485 calories, 14 g total fat, 9 g saturated fat, 93 g carbohydrate, 1.5 g fiber, 6 g protein

Nutrition information per serving (1 bun (1/15 of recipe) with glaze): 385 calories, 11 g total fat, 7 g saturated fat, 74 g carbohydrate, 1 g fiber, 4.5 g protein

More cinnamon buns

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2 thoughts on “Deep Dish Cinnamon Buns with Grandma Hazel’s Creamy Glaze

  1. Yeah! I love the way you throw these kinds of recipes out there along with tips on how to stay fit. The combination of these two is really the way life is all the time.

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